The Devil in the Shape of a Woman: Witchcraft in Colonial New England

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - Morgan, a servant, " mary johnson, yale UniversityConfessing to "familiarity with the devils, was executed by Connecticut officials in 1648. The case of ann cole, who was "taken with very strange Fits, " fueled an outbreak of witchcraft accusations in Hartford a generation before the notorious events at Salem.

The Devil in the Shape of a Woman: Witchcraft in Colonial New England #ad - More than three hundred years later, the question "Why?" still haunts us. A pioneer work in…the sexual structuring of society. Karlsen reveals the social construction of witchcraft in seventeenth-century New England and illuminates the larger contours of gender relations in that society. Why were these and other women likely witches—vulnerable to accusations of witchcraft and possession? Carol F.

A wealthy boston widow, Ann Hibbens was hanged in 1656 for casting spells on her neighbors. This is not just another book about witchcraft. Edmund S.

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In the Devil's Snare: The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692

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Vintage #ad - Award-winning historian mary Beth Norton reexamines the Salem witch trials in this startlingly original, meticulously researched, and utterly riveting study. Horrifyingly violent indian attacks had all but emptied the northern frontier of settlers, and many traumatized refugees—including the main accusers of witches—had fled to communities like Salem.

Struck by the similarities between what the refugees had witnessed and what the witchcraft “victims” described, many were quick to see a vast conspiracy of the Devil in league with the French and the Indians threatening New England on all sides. By providing this essential context to the famous events, and by casting her net well beyond the borders of Salem itself, Norton sheds new light on one of the most perplexing and fascinating periods in our history.

In the Devil's Snare: The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692 #ad - In 1692 the people of Massachusetts were living in fear, and not solely of satanic afflictions. Meanwhile the colony’s leaders, defensive about their own failure to protect the frontier, pondered how God’s people could be suffering at the hands of savages.

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Salem Possessed: Social Origins of Witchcraft

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Harvard University Press #ad - The stark immediacy of what happened in 1692 has obscured the complex web of human passion which climaxed in the Salem witch trialsFrom rich and varied sources—many neglected and unknown—Paul Boyer and Stephen Nissenbaum give us a picture of the people and events more intricate and more fascinating than any other in the massive literature.

Tormented girls writhing in agony, stern judges meting out harsh verdicts, nineteen bodies swinging on Gallows Hill. Not simply a dramatic and isolated event, the salem outbreak has wider implications for our understanding of developments central to the American experience: the disintegration of Puritanism, the problems besetting farmer and householder, the pressures of land and population in New England towns, the shifting role of the church, and the powerful impact of commercial capitalism.

Salem Possessed: Social Origins of Witchcraft #ad - It is a story of powerful and deeply divided families and of a community determined to establish an independent identity—beset by restraints and opposition from without and factional conflicts from within—and a minister whose obsessions helped to bring this volatile mix to the flash point.

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Entertaining Satan: Witchcraft and the Culture of Early New England

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Oxford University Press #ad - He provides a new preface that puts forth a broader overview of witchcraft and looks at its place around the world--from ancient times right up to the present. In the first edition of the bancroft Prize-winning Entertaining Satan, John Putnam Demos presented an entirely new perspective on American witchcraft.

Now demos has revisited his original work and updated it to illustrate why these early Americans' strange views on witchcraft still matter to us today. By investigating the surviving historical documents of over a hundred actual witchcraft cases, he vividly recreated the world of New England during the witchcraft trials and brought to light fascinating information on the role of witchcraft in early American culture.

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Good Wives: Image and Reality in the Lives of Women in Northern New England, 1650-1750

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Vintage #ad - Good Wives: Image and Reality in the Lives of Women in Northern New England, 1650-1750 #ad - In these pages we encounter the awesome burdens--and the considerable power--of a New England housewife's domestic life and witness her occasional forays into the world of men. Painstakingly researched, lively with scandal and homely detail, Good Wives is history at its best. This enthralling work of scholarship strips away abstractions to reveal the hidden--and not always stoic--face of the "goodwives" of colonial America.

We see her borrowing from her neighbors, raising--and, all too often, loving her husband, mourning--her children, and even attaining fame as a heroine of frontier conflicts or notoriety as a murderess.

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The Devil in Massachusetts: A Modern Inquiry into the Salem Witch Trials

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Papamoa Press #ad - In the end, one is pretty sure what was wrong with Cotton Mather, the august judges, and the tormented young girls. The devil in massachusetts is a vivid and compassionate reconstruction of the Salem witchcraft hysteria. Marion starkey has written history which illustrates the past and at the same time packs and important contemporary moral.

Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. It is certainly a ‘one sitting’ sort of book, with the dramatic appeal of the well-told story and the significances of good human history. Gerald warner brace“a fresh and full narration…of one of the most lurid, pitiful and deeply significant episodes in American history….

Odell Shepard. Medical science that day had no better explanation than “the evil eye”; and so Massachusetts was precipitated into a reign of terror that did not end until the highest in the land had been accused of witchcraft—ministers, a judge, the Governor’s lady. It stands alone in applying modern psychiatric knowledge to the witchcraft hysteria.

The Devil in Massachusetts: A Modern Inquiry into the Salem Witch Trials #ad - Nearly three hundred years ago the fate of Massachusetts was delivered into the hands of a pack of young girls. Because of the fantasies and hysterical antics of unbalanced teenagers, decent men and women were sent to the gallows. This dramatic and deeply moving book combines a narrative that has the pace and excitement of a novel, a timeless portrait of bigotry and a self-righteousness, and an authentic history of the Salem witch trials.

Written with sly humor, much of the book reads like a novel.

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The Salem Witch Trials: A Day-by-Day Chronicle of a Community Under Siege

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Taylor Trade Publishing #ad - The Salem Witch Trials: A Day-by-Day Chronicle of a Community Under Siege #ad - Based on over twenty years of original archival research, this history unfolds a nearly day-by-day narrative of the Salem Witch Trials as the citizens of Salem experienced the outbreak of hysteria.

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Witch-Hunting in Seventeenth-Century New England: A Documentary History 1638-1693, Second Edition
: A Documentary History 1638-1693

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Duke University Press Books #ad - The cases examined begin in 1638, connecticut, extend to the Salem outbreak in 1692, and document for the first time the extensive Stamford-Fairfield, witch-hunt of 1692–1693. They cover trials for witchcraft, reports of diabolical possessions, suits of defamation, and reports of preternatural events.

. This superb documentary collection illuminates the history of witchcraft and witch-hunting in seventeenth-century New England. Here one encounters witch-hunts through the eyes of those who participated in them: the accusers, the victims, the judges. The original texts tell in vivid detail a multi-dimensional story that conveys not only the process of witch-hunting but also the complexity of culture and society in early America.

Hall addresses a wide range of important issues: witchcraft lore, religious ideologies, antagonistic social relationships, the vulnerability of women, popular and learned understandings of witchcraft and the devil, and the role of the legal system. This volume is an extraordinarily significant resource for the study of gender, religion, village politics, and popular culture in seventeenth-century New England.

Witch-Hunting in Seventeenth-Century New England: A Documentary History 1638-1693, Second Edition
: A Documentary History 1638-1693
#ad - In his incisive introduction, David D. The documents capture deep-rooted attitudes and expectations and reveal the tensions, envy, anger, and misfortune that underlay communal life and family relationships within New England’s small towns and villages. Primary sources include court depositions as well as excerpts from the diaries and letters of contemporaries.

Each section is preceded by headnotes that describe the case and its background and refer the reader to important secondary interpretations.

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Revolutionary Backlash: Women and Politics in the Early American Republic Early American Studies

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University of Pennsylvania Press #ad - Integrating the approaches of women's historians and political historians, this book explores changes in women's status that occurred from the time of the American Revolution until the election of Andrew Jackson. Although the period after the revolution produced no collective movement for women's rights, women built on precedents established during the Revolution and gained an informal foothold in party politics and male electoral activities.

The seneca falls convention is typically seen as the beginning of the first women's rights movement in the United States. The increasing sophistication of party organizations and triumph of universal suffrage for white males marginalized those who could not vote, especially women. After the publication of mary wollstonecraft's A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, a widespread debate about the nature of women's rights ensued.

Revolutionary Backlash: Women and Politics in the Early American Republic Early American Studies #ad - Yet all was not lost. Women, in turn, attended rallies, organized political activities, and voiced their opinions on the issues of the day. Through these organizations, women found another way to practice politics. The state of new jersey attempted a bold experiment: for a brief time, women there voted on the same terms as men.

Yet as rosemarie zagarri argues in Revolutionary Backlash, this opening for women soon closed. By 1828, women's politicization was seen more as a liability than as a strength, contributing to a divisive political climate that repeatedly brought the country to the brink of civil war.

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Damned Women: Sinners and Witches in Puritan New England

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Cornell University Press #ad - Nevertheless, reis explains, womanhood and evil were inextricably linked in the minds and hearts of seventeenth-century New England Puritans. Women and men feared hell equally but Puritan culture encouraged women to believe it was their vile natures that would take them there rather than the particular sins they might have committed.

Following the salem witchcraft trials, Reis argues, Puritans' understanding of sin and the devil changed. In negotiating their beliefs about the devil's powers, both women and men embedded womanhood in the discourse of depravity. Puritan ministers insisted that women and men were equal in the sight of God, with both sexes equally capable of cleaving to Christ or to the devil.

In her analysis of the cultural construction of gender in early America, Puritan evaluations of womanhood, Elizabeth Reis explores the intersection of Puritan theology, and the Salem witchcraft episodes. She finds in those intersections the basis for understanding why women were accused of witchcraft more often than men, why they confessed more often, and why they frequently accused other women of being witches.

Damned Women: Sinners and Witches in Puritan New England #ad - Ministers and laity conceived of a Satan who tempted sinners and presided physically over hell, rather than one who possessed souls in the living world. Women and men became increasingly confident of their redemption, although women more than men continued to imagine themselves as essentially corrupt, even after the Great Awakening.

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Good Wives, Nasty Wenches, and Anxious Patriarchs: Gender, Race, and Power in Colonial Virginia Published by the Omohundro Institute of Early American ... and the University of North Carolina Press

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Omohundro Institute and University of North Carolina Press #ad - Brown's analysis extends through bacon's Rebellion in 1676, an important juncture in consolidating the colony's white male public culture, and into the eighteenth century. In response to the presence of indians, the shortage of labor, and the insecurity of social rank, Virginia's colonial government tried to reinforce its authority by regulating the labor and sexuality of English servants and by making legal distinctions between English and African women.

She demonstrates that, free people of color, despite elite planters' dominance, wives, children, and enslaved men and women continued to influence the meaning of race and class in colonial Virginia. But the rise of racial slavery also transformed gender relations, including ideals of masculinity. Both a basic social relationship and a model for other social hierarchies, gender helped determine the construction of racial categories and the institution of slavery in Virginia.

Good Wives, Nasty Wenches, and Anxious Patriarchs: Gender, Race, and Power in Colonial Virginia Published by the Omohundro Institute of Early American ... and the University of North Carolina Press #ad - This practice, along with making slavery hereditary through the mother, contributed to the cultural shift whereby women of African descent assumed from lower-class English women both the burden of fieldwork and the stigma of moral corruption. Kathleen brown examines the origins of racism and slavery in British North America from the perspective of gender.

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